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Polticial use of social media. BlogSchgmog, Feb 21, 2011

Part of President Obama’s successful campaign for high office was due to a motivated constituency who were active with social media. In 2008, there were about 50% more Democrats than Republicans stumping for their candidate online. Just two years later, that gap has closed. Perhaps more importantly, most party supporters are now using social media. LINK to full story

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22% of online Americans used social networking or Twitter for politics in 2010 campaign. pewinternet.org. Jan 27, 2011.

After first gaining prominence as tools for political engagement during the 2008 presidential election, social media became a regular part of the political environment for voters in the 2010 midyear elections. Some 22% of online adults used Twitter or social networking sites such as Facebook or MySpace in the months leading up to the November, 2010 elections to connect to the campaign or the election itself. (Overall, fully 73% of adult internet userswent online to get news or information about the 2010 midterm elections, or to get involved in the campaign in one way or another.)

In contrast to the 2008 race—in which Democratic voters led the way in their use of online social networks for political purposes—Republican voters and supporters of the “Tea Party” movement caught up with Democrats in their use of social media in 2010. LINK to full story

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The political power of social media: Technology, the Public Sphere, and Political Chage. By Clay Shirky in Foreign Affairs. Jan/Feb 2011.

On January 17, 2001, during the impeachment trial of Philippine President Joseph Estrada, loyalists in the Philippine Congress voted to set aside key evidence against him. Less than two hours after the decision was announced, thousands of Filipinos, angry that their corrupt president might be let off the hook, converged on Epifanio de los Santos Avenue, a major crossroads in Manila. The protest was arranged, in part, by forwarded text messages reading, “Go 2 EDSA. Wear blk.” The crowd quickly swelled, and in the next few days, over a million people arrived, choking traffic in downtown Manila. LINK to full story

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Political campaigns and social media. Video. C-spanvideo.org. Oct 25, 2010.

GOP beating Democrats with social media for midterm elections. PBS.org/mediashift. Oct 25, 2010.

The role of social media in political campaigns. Sarah Granger. sfgate.com. Oct 22, 2010.

Social media energizes political campaigns down under. NMincite.com. Aug 17, 2010.

How political advocacy groups use social media. OhMyGov.com. Aug 10, 2010.

How black politicians use social media. Politics365.com. July 30, 2010.

Burson-Marsteller Study: Social media use by U.S. based political advocacy groups. burson-marsteller.com. July 13, 2010.

Study shows social media’s influence on political elections. EditorsWeblog.org. July 12, 2010.

How to use social media in a political campaign. RicksRSS.com. June 10, 2010

How political campaigns are using social media for real results. Mashable.com. June 9, 2010.

Social media is the new political arena. nmpolitics.net. June 8,2010.

Wave goodbye to old methods of communications and collaboration. [NewPolitics.net] ndn.org. June 4, 2009.

Social Media: 4. Political uses and implications for representative democracy. Canadian Parliament. PDF. March 22, 2010.

Social media use will grow in political campaigns; local politicians skeptical. Wilkes Barre Citizens Voice via edmitchell.com. March 21, 2010.

Using social media in political campaigns (Part 1). NewMediaCampaigns, Sept 24, 2009

Social media is slowly changing the demographics of political engagement.ReadWriteWeb.com. Sept 1, 2009

How can political campaigns and advocacy organizations use social media to build support? SocialSignal.com 2008

Political use of social media: Edwards (1); Obama (.5); Clinton (NA). Scobleizer.com. Jan 17, 2007.